Sacramento Christian Organization of Parent Educators
IS a homeschool group focused on supporting member families and encouraging new homeschool families

Fast Food Lessons

By David West

*This article originally appeared in the SCOPE Newsletter Volume 27 – Issue 2. It has been slightly edited for re-publication.

As my daughter and I walked into a familiar fast-food restaurant, I sensed something was different. The parking lot was full and it was well after the normal lunch hour. Then upon entering the establishment, we found it packed with people. An overdressed patron occupied almost every table.

Turning to my daughter I said, “Something is happening here. I wonder what it is?” After ordering ice cream for two, I asked the cashier, “What’s going on today?” She informed me that the restaurant was having open interviews for jobs.

Not thinking much more of it, I found an open table and started to enjoy a tasty treat with my daughter. As it turned out, I couldn’t have picked a better seat in order to have a great opportunity to pass on some wisdom.

Our table was situated in just the right place for me to overhear the store manager interview potential employees. I couldn’t resist listening in and commenting to my daughter. We were close enough for me to hear the conversations but far enough away that I could whisper insights to her without being overheard.

“You always do that,” she said after I started talking.

“What’s that?” I asked.

“Talk about stuff that’s going on around us,” she reported.

“Yes, I suppose you’re right,” I said.

“Do you think the manager will hire that person?” I asked.

“I don’t know,” she replied.

“I wouldn’t if I were the boss. Do you know why?”

“No.”

One of the potential employees hadn’t worked in over three years. The manager asked why and the person answered, “Because no one is hiring.” The manager then asked, “How many places have you applied?” The response came back, “Ten.”

I told my daughter, “She lacks initiative. As a store manager, I would hope she had been applying for ten jobs per week, not ten in the last three years while complaining that no one is hiring.” Another potential employee had a hard time keeping his pants up. I mentioned to my daughter that managers don’t like dealing with uniform issues. “If this young man can’t keep his pants up during an interview when he is trying to impress the boss, what will it be like after he is hired.”

And so the conversation continued like this through several interviews. I was enjoying the ice cream, but even more, I was enjoying a chance to share insights with my girl.

I told my daughter, “This would be bold and not many people would do it. But do you know what I would do if I were here waiting to be interviewed? Instead of sitting at a table and waiting for my number to be called, I would be picking up trash under the table and cleaning up after patrons. The manager would be sure to notice and then ask me about this when it was my turn. I would answer, “Since serving the customers and the establishment is what I will be hired to do, why waste time getting started?”

Parents have a great responsibility to train their children. This burden falls especially on the dads. Not only are we to teach them all that God has commanded (see Deuteronomy 6), but many practical things that will help them throughout life. Proverbs is full of this kind of instruction from a father to a son and it is a great example for us.

My young lady may not remember much of this conversation, but as many more just like this pile up over the years, they certainly will shape her thinking. My goal as a dad is not to see my daughter get a job at a fast-food restaurant. The goal is to see her grow up to be a woman who works diligently for the glory of God. The work ethic I was promoting that day is as relevant at school, home, or church. God tells us that whatever our hand finds to do, we should do it with all our might. These are the type of lessons I want my children to learn concerning the workplace. As a dad, it is my responsibility to help my children become productive, work-loving, self-starters. Modeling this is, of course, the best way. Another way is by always talking about “stuff” that’s going on around us.